A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

Infant Mortality Awareness Month

September is Infant Mortality Awareness Month and here at the Wisconsin Women’s Health Foundation, we aim to decrease the prevalence of infant mortality for mothers, babies, and families in Wisconsin. One of the main causes of infant mortality is maternal smoking.

Maternal smoking more than doubles the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). 1

  • Babies of mothers who smoke during pregnancy are at two to three times greater risk of SIDS 1, 2
  • Babies exposed to secondhand smoke are at two times greater risk of SIDS 3

 

Maternal Smoking & Other Health Outcomes:

Prenatal Maternal Smoking
  • Preterm delivery
  • Low birth weight
  • Miscarriage or stillbirth
Infant Exposure to Secondhand   Smoke
  • Risk factor for development of asthma and exacerbation of existing asthma, 4 respiratory infections, wheezing, and allergic sensitivity5
  • Development and increased duration of ear infections 3
Maternal Health and   Well-being
  • Association between smoking and postpartum depression5,6
  • Lower prevalence and shorter duration of breastfeeding7
  • Association between smoking and other substance use (alcohol and marijuana)
  • Financial Impacts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Breath is a smoking cessation program for pregnant women in Wisconsin. First Breath uses a “train-the-trainer” model. Wisconsin Women’s Health Foundation (WWHF) staff train local prenatal care professionals in brief intervention smoking cessation counseling and motivational interviewing techniques. We provide client self-help materials, small client gifts, and ongoing technical support. First Breath smoking cessation counseling is incorporated into existing prenatal care appointments.

30324678

First Breath Contact Information:

Carl Oliver, CHES Program Coordinator at (608)251-1675 x117 or coliver@wwhf.org

Chelsea Stover, CHES Program Coordinator at (608)251-1675, x118 or cstover@wwhf.org

 

Citations

1 Anderson HR, Cook DG. Passive smoking and sudden infant death syndrome: review of the epidemiological evidence. Thorax. 1997 Nov; 52(11):1003-9. Review. Thorax 1999 Apr; 54(4):365-6. PubMed PMID: 9487351; PubMed Central PMCID:PMC1758452.

2 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006 [accessed 2012 Mar 1].

3 Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004 [accessed 2012 Mar 1].

4 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Washington, DC, EPA/600/6-90/006F, December 1992.

5 Allen AM, Prince CB, Dietz PM. Postpartum depressive symptoms and smoking relapse. Am J Prev Med. 2009 Jan;36(1):9-12. PubMed PMID: 19095161.

6 Glassman, A. Smoking Cessation and Major Depression. JAMA 1990.

7 Giglia R, Binns CW, Alfonso H. Maternal cigarette smoking and breastfeeding duration. Acta Paediatr. 2006 Nov;95(11):1370-4. MID: 17062462

Leave a Reply